Share what you know.

The first phase of the Challenge has closed. Thanks to all of you who shared your experiences with professional learning video.

#RDChallenge       0 Days Left

Theme

Please share a personal story about a time in which you used videos for professional learning.


45 experiences
Profile jht dzgj 400x400

Katie R

North Bullitt High School

I am a big fan of TED talks. They are incredibly motivating and typically have a very powerful message. In the world of education, I don't think enough time is devoted to building teacher capacity. TED talks are a great way to share a message quickly and to get people talking about the topic at hand.

LS

Lora S

Shelby County

As the Staff Developer for a district focused on implementing high effect size instructional strategies we created an effective Learning Targets rubric to help teachers self-assess! We follow the work of John Hattie, and knew that the most effective practice was student co-creation of the rubrics and targets, but we weren't sure what that even looked like. During a classroom visit, I saw a teacher actually co-creating the Learning Target with students and a lightbulb went off in my head, "THAT's what it looks like!" So, I asked if we might videotape her routine so that other teachers might see it as an exemplar. She agreed. We created it. Our public relations manager assisted in formatting it and publishing it. Then, I was able to use it to train at the next training session. The response? Teachers were immediately trying it the very next day, and sharing their attempts! The video example gave them just what they needed, from a colleague right in their district, and made it feel very "do-able"!

Profile u1 g2nde 400x400

Don

Ladue Horton Watkins High

Videotaping a lesson doesn't carry the same importance to me, than the true need to teach media literacy, which is the single most important skill NOT being taught in schools consistently. I am a HUGE proponent of students creating video in the classroom to leverage media literacy skills and content comprehension. This particular challenge, based on the blog post describing why video in education is the first challenge, seems to want to focus more on videotaping teachers instructing in the classroom or teachers using video for their own professional development. While I agree this is a strong element of learning for educators, I think the focus of video in education should be on teachers and students creating videos TOGETHER, to leverage media literacy principles of message, text, visuals and audio, culture and purpose to offer greater engagement to content analysis and comprehension.

Link: https://about.me/dongoble

Profile kplapbdo 400x400

Daniel V

Oldham County High School

Video is a great tool for learning. I enjoy TED talks, KHAN academy, and YouTube on a regular basis. The videos I enjoy the best are the videos that inspire creative thinking through powerful, authentic messages. I am an advocate for reflection and I share that with my students. I also challenge them regularly as well. My students understand "why" I asked them to do what they do in my classroom and it is shown in their reflective writing pieces that we do. The reason I share this story is that my idea going forward is to create an inspirational video that provides authentic communication from student interviews and classroom observations in the different stages of the learning process. So instead of just having their responses on paper or just filming the classroom during instruction, I want to combine both of these to create a video that links; student engagement and their personal thoughts. I think this could a be a powerful tool to inspire creative minds going forward.

Profile profile photo

Rene

National Association for Gifted Children

I use short video clips from fields outside of education. My purpose is to help shift my colleagues' mindset from the comfort of school and spark creativity. Getting out of our comfort zone and seeing how others outside of education also force themselves to think differently to create solutions has proven helpful for me in leading organizational change. At lease--building the urgency and momentum for change.

Profile 282b626

jozette m

West Generation Academy Denver CO

I love using video clips as a quick way to introduce background knowledge, or introduce a visual/audible example of business/marketing concepts. The most effective use of video however, is when my students are responsible to show evidence of their learning by capturing their work on my class iPads. Students have used aps like iMovie to create compelling commercials, presentation clips, etc. Here is a great example of how my entrepreneur students made commercials for their food truck businesses they created.

I love utilizing technology in the classroom and I find that using tutorial videos via YouTube are very helpful in learning how to utilize all the new and upcoming technology quickly. It gives me a quick overview, which then allows me to think of multiple ways I can implement the new technology with my students.

I have found short (4-5) minute videos with a specific focus (e.g., unpacking a standard, designing a learning objective, creating a formative assessment, etc.) to be the most helpful. Recently, a colleague of mine began editing these "small bite" videos to include reflective questions and running commentary. I really like both features because I get the chance to independently deconstruct the video, but I also like the straightforward presentation of information (after all, I don't always know what I don't know and no amount of reflection can necessarily change that:) Finally, I enjoy the streamlined focus--finding the right video is easy and efficient.

MK

Mindi K-R

Shelby County East Middle School

My coach and I used a video of a lesson to help my professional learning in two ways. First, was for my own professional growth. I wanted to see how much "talking" I was doing. My coach scripted my lesson and I used my script and the video to work on getting better at the workshop model. Second, was to help me with my students and to help my students with their speaking and listening growth goals. After the lesson, I watched the video not only to see myself but also to see how my students were answering the questions. I think that this kind of professional learning would be invaluable. If I had clips of "real footage" - teachers teaching, students learning, etc., how powerful that tool would be. I could see us doing this and then analyzing just a small clip during data team or our professional learning communities. I know that just from analyzing that one video, I learned so much about myself and my students, way more than sitting and listening to someone speak about the workshop model.

Profile gjzucpjk 400x400

Carly B

Boyd County High School

I've watched several Khan Academy videos to strengthen my understanding of a concept. It is helpful to see how another teacher would teach that particular concept.

I have used video in a variety of ways, but the first time I used video in my classroom, I was told by my assistant principal that we would each be videotaping ourselves as we teach a lesson, and then watching it with her to debrief the lesson. I was amazed at what I was made aware of from the opportunity to take the role of "student" in my classroom. Together with the AP we set goals for my next steps. Since I was part of seeing the video, I was part of the process of goal setting and was therefore able to really buy-in to the next steps. Now as an instructional coach, watching clips of a teacher's practice with the teacher can have the effect of moving a full jump ahead of where we might have gotten simply through debriefs. We also upload videos to the Teaching Channel and share practice across schools, so that teachers, especially those who don't have a collaborator, can start to collaborate with one another.

Profile gilderman picture

Glen Gilderman

Proctor Senior High

My school district is revamping our evaluation process. One of our biggest issues is the cost of getting substitutes for the peer observers. Most of our teachers would prefer to stay in their classrooms, but they also want to take on the career ladder position of Team Leader. That requires observing other teachers as many as 10 observation per year. As I read the original idea of using video to do this, I envisioned using this technique in our school. I'm looking forward to learning more from other teachers as we share our experiences on this site!

Profile bsbxs3gw 400x400

Lyndsay Nottingham

Boone County Schools

I actually just participated in a live mock-interview, as the interviewee, for #ptchat and #ntchat. It provided an opportunity for many of us to interact all at once. It was rather nerve-wracking being able to see myself in an interview and also see the reactions of multiple people; however, it was a great learning opportunity! I also am lucky enough to have a video recording to review how to interview even better the next time! I highly recommend videotaping yourself to see how your present yourself. It's a wonderful opportunity for growth. If anyone is interested, I attached the link to my blog post about this opportunity, which also has a link to the video.

Link: https://goo.gl/65MC33

Profile me

Ashley LS

North Oldham High School

I was once in a professional development for literacy educators that included the following spoken word poem as an opening prompt for discussion. I've used it pretty much every year in class since then. My students always react positively, and I often use it in conjunction with Sir Ken Robinson's, "Schools Kill Creativity" to prompt discussions in class about the need for and problems with current educational paradigms. Every time I watch it, I reflect on that topic myself. As a creative writer and thinker, I think using more poetry, drama, and art presented through technology is a valuable and under-used method for starting conversations amongst and inspiring teachers.

Profile 6djcjmyn 400x400

Kate B

Southern Regional Board of Education

My district is trying to get an in-house professional development system up and running by asking teachers to present after school on various educational topics, but we've encountered scheduling conflicts for folks to attend in person. For example, I was asked three weeks ago to present on how I run Socratic Seminars in my class, and while I accepted the invitation, I later had a scheduling conflict (department meeting) and could not present live. Rather than back out of presenting, I recorded a screencast of the process (video attached) and prepared a packet of resources for participants. I know that 9 people attended the live session after school, but when I check the YouTube video analytics only 6 people have viewed the video at this time.

Profile 9wfxhn1b 400x400

Heidi G

Davless Public Schools (Kentucky)

We know that good teaching is good teaching. However, sometimes it is difficult to determine how to transfer that good teaching into our own practice, especially in special education or certain specialty areas. I may read about or watch a video of a teacher modeling a technique but may be unsure how I would apply that technique to my instruction. One time I spent a day facilitating discussions about how the Common Core would impact instructional practices for teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing. Throughout the discussion, teachers kept wanting to see things in action. So that afternoon I went home and searched through my collection of videos I recorded for self-analysis and brought them in the next day for the group to watch, analyze and discuss. Even though it wasn't a perfect video, teachers felt more comfortable after seeing my strategies in action. As we are moving to increase teacher effectiveness and, ultimately, student outcomes, videos demonstrating best practice are key to professional learning.

I like to use videos of other teachers using techniques that I would like my teachers to use. It helps for them to be able to see a strategy or lesson implementation prior to doing it, and it creates more buy-in when it is the video of a peer, rather than a teacher leader or admin telling them about how to use the strategy. My county has moved to some systemic videos for training tutorials, such as dealing with blood-born pathogens or sexual harassment in the work place. After watching the videos, there are quizzes that need to be completed. This is not as effective, because people can share answers and are doing so out of compliance, not for true professional development. I like the idea of flipped learning for PD purposes, but it has to be personalized and directly connected to an individual teacher's area of growth.

SF

Shane F

North East Florida Educational Consortium

As a former Reading Coach, I have realized the power in self-reflection. In a course I designed, educators who are ready to complete their reading endorsement must show evidence that they both have a deep understanding of teaching reading and are able to apply what they have learned in an authentic setting. Teachers create a lesson incorporating the components of reading including writing. After their plan has been approved based on a detailed rubric, they video a lesson of their teaching. Facilitators give specific feedback to the teacher and the teacher completes a reflection of their practice. In this professional learning course, educators are required to show three examples of their practice in video form with lessons and reflections. After the videos have been completed satisfactorily, educators are eligible for a Reading Endorsement--the goal of a 300-hour PL journey! Feedback has been positive and has encouraged our team to begin expanding this practice into other opportunities for our educators.

Link: http://www2.nefec.org/elearning/readingendorsement/

Profile kplapbdo 400x400

Daniel V

Oldham County High School

Expansion of earlier post -- I usually watch TED talks for inspiring creativity when I feel stagnant or stuck in rut, and KHAN academy and YouTube for differentiation strategies when needed. I have also filmed myself teaching to reflect on my language used during different phases of the learning process and to watch the interactions between students during certain activities. This year I have added instructional videos to my website. These serve as supplements for my students, not the primary source of instruction like the traditional flipped classroom that some teachers in my building have started to use this year. I have found that the parents of my students enjoy the videos, as much, if not more than the kids. A lot parents have forgotten the math they learned in high school from not using it or they weren't very good at it in the first place. They benefit from them so they can help their children with their homework. It's been great to hear these stories from them.

Link: http://www.viehmannclasses.weebly.com

Profile img 1167

Derek

Pittsburgh Perry Hs

The teacher leadership team at my school has been trying to figure out a way to have instructional rounds, but with hectic schedules and the everyday operations in a school, there was no way to do it. During lunch duty one day, I turned to another teacher and said, "Why don't we just video tape it?" I can't believe we didn't think of it earlier. But the next day, she went in with an iPad, recorded the lesson, and the next day we were able to watch it. We used our district's evidence collection tool, and we just analyzed evidence and which domain the evidence would fall in to.

Profile 6f ndb6b 400x400

Todd B

Warren Woods Middle School

Our staff recently use videos from the Teaching Channel to look at ways other schools use learning targets. The use of videos helped show us good examples of how other schools made the transitions to using target that we are currently going through. It is nice to see other examples rather that just seeing them in a book. It can be hard to find examples that fit your specific genre of teaching but at least seeing into others classrooms make the learning more meaningful

Profile srrbdwb8 400x400

Aaron G

Huffaker Elementary School

We developed the Core Task Project in Washoe County, Nevada (Reno). The effort was teacher-driven and involved teachers finding great professional learning experiences (more often than not on Youtube) and sharing them with each other. In turn, we would find or create curricular resources matched to the learning and take everything through the Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle—something akin to Japanese Lesson Study. Instead of others going to conferences and telling teachers what to do, we flipped the script. We found the conference keynotes (academics like P. David Pearson, Timothy Shanahan, Dan Willingham) and brought them to us through video. It was teachers who coconstructed meaning from these videos and were able to match theory to practice. And, because all the video was online, our effective cost was nothing.

Profile 858907ddb8e2739d6d14b00acccc4c1c 400x400

Jana B

Daviess County Public Schools (KY)

I would like to share three different occasions of which using videos helped increase my professional learning. The first was having to video myself teaching to submit for National Board certification. One of the best ways to grow in our own professional practice is to watch you and your class interact on film. Critiquing the classroom performance is such a valuable tool. Second was calibrating myself using the Teachscape instrument for the TPGES/Danielson Teacher Effectiveness Framework. Lastly, vetting and scripting for teaching videos that would be shared on Teachingthecore.org website allowed me to appreciate student and teacher academic interactions, justify best practices and observe great teaching at my convenience.

Link: http://www.teachingthecore.org/

Our division has created many in-seat professional development sessions that are provided onsite at schools in shorter increments of time and off-site for full-day deeper dives. To augment these different sessions and to facilitate a move toward a more cohesive blended learning model, we have created "Pocket PDs". These five to ten minute videos capture the learning that is disseminated at our trainings. Our biggest challenge is promoting these asynchronous learning opportunities and getting them to a larger audience.

Profile ponq dyd 400x400

Kristin M

Northwestern High School

I was last videoed in my practicum experience. I remember how challenging it was to watch the video. Watching the video showed me how much I talked, controlled the class, and stayed in one part of the room. It is for teachers to have a false impression of our teaching and classroom. Video evidence holds the greatest conviction for teachers about their teaching. I know I have forgotten this practice, but plan to implement video and reflection of my teaching next year. As educators we can not stay comfortable where we are, but always strive to grow.

Profile nkffqpon 400x400

Cheryl R

Highland Junior High School- Gilbert, AZ

As a visual learner good videos make all the difference in the efficacy of my practice. One of the best groups of videos are those in ATLAS (Accomplished Teaching Learning and Schools) a video library of accomplished teaching. These impactful videos include a variety of tagging- a set of standards or frameworks. For instance, ATLAS currenly has tagging for Common Core, Next Generation Science Standards, National Board standards, Deeper Learning Competenciesand edTPA. PreService programs use the videos, and I plan to use them in my coaching as well site PD. Furthermore, the videos are accompanied by teacher commentaries that describe the classroom and student dynamics as well as an analysis of the whole lesson or unit of study- most of which does not appear in the 15 minute videos. To learn more, use the link below, and go to ATLAS.

Link: http://nbpts.org

Profile 1izefdrj 400x400

Ben

Glenn Duncan Elementary School

I use video for all the professional development courses I design and facilitate. Video allows us to see content put into practice with real students. Video examples also provide us with exemplars to examine and discuss. When looking at how English Language Arts instruction is shifting, video of students and teachers provide a starting point for discussions of how instruction has looked and how it needs to look to support every student. Video allows teachers to see each other in action and allows the person in the video to explain their thinking and rationale around the instructional decisions that were made. Video also serves as evidence for teachers to use as part of their evaluation process. When looking at the difference between an effective teacher and highly effective teacher, video can show the multiple instructional moves that are made in a lesson and provide so much more information than you can get from observation notes.

Profile katephoto

Kate F

Michigan's Integrated Mathematics Initiative

I have used various videos like TED, Teaching Channel, or youtube for what I'll call "examples" of teaching, but the most illuminating use of video was when it was required in my undergrad student teaching, and in my grad TESOL class. Both times I had to video tape myself for later observation. The experience I had in real time was totally different than what I saw on video, including weird mannerisms, confusing explanations, and children crawling around on the floor under their desks (how did I not see that in real life???). Video taping for self-critiques and reflection was very illuminating, entertaining, and humbling.

Our district became a Google District in February of 2014. Although there were optional training opportunities offered, this caused a heightened strain on the already overtaxed Information Services department. In response, I offered 12 Google PD sessions in order to share resources with others. We set aside an hour during our work day to learn more about Google. We spent the first 30 minutes watching a recorded webinar. We used a back channel so participants could record their thoughts/questions during the webinar. It also offered opportunity to answer each others questions and share ideas. The last 30 minutes were spent exploring and testing what we learned. There was no agenda and the teacher leaders were free to explore whatever they they were interested in. My role was that of a co-learner and facilitator. I learned more in those 1 hour blocks about technology than I did as an undergrad pursuing a Computer Science Minor. A bonus was that 'tech buddies' continue to share resources today.

Profile pro close up

Ernie R

Walter Johnson Junior High School

While I can see benefits to using video for professional learning, my own experiences with using video are limited in this area. I used video as part of my National Board re-certification portfolio -- recording a discussion with teachers at my school as we discussed the implementation of Common Core Standards in our social studies classes. I noticed that our video-recorded discussion progressed at a much higher level than our usual department meetings. While it could have been that my colleagues were focused on helping me complete my re-certification, I believe that when I hit the "record" button, it was much like when a guest enters my classroom -- I perk up a bit and try to do my very best. I wonder if occasionally using video to record discussions about recently implemented strategies might encourage deeper discussions among colleagues.

Academic and professional speaking is a critical form of expression for language learners. Students learn that language has power to connect; they feel empowered to extend their curiosity, with increasingly self-driven learning. Attached is a video my students considered one of their all-time favorites. In their video, they sought ocean experts to answer their questions. It resulted in Skypes w/ 2 responding oceanographers. Those conversations shifted student ideas of learning for the remainder of the year. They'd been inspired to question more, re-consider "audience" (now they had evidence were "real people" were out there!), and motivated to use more complex language. All from a "simple" video.. I now envision synchronous & asynchronous videos (for other time zones) to connect my highschool students for deepened academic conversation and responses to real-world issues. Ultimately, students will teach others how to create this same type of collaboration via their own best practices.

Link: http://mswendisworld.blogspot.com/2013/12/ocean-questions-wanted.html

Profile b wellman photo

Bruce W

Olathe Northwest High School

1) I use videos for learning more about my content (chemistry) and new discoveries in science that I incorporate into my class presentations. I share how I acquired my new knowledge with my student to model the need to stay current in one’s profession. 2) I used video as part of my National Board Certification and renewal process. This use of video required me to view my own teaching and identify specific evidence from that video that illustrated specific instructional choices that positively impacted student learning. This practice of critically looking at my own classroom actions has helped me greatly to be more intentional about my choices during class time. 3) I use videos fromteachingchannel.org to help me learn new classroom strategies. These videos are critical for me to see how a given strategy is executed in a REAL classroom by a master teacher. The growth in availability and ease of use of video has definitely changed the way I stay current and grow in my content and professional practice.

Profile 7d5d89d3431c40e5de9ae6bf8f0297ba 400x400

Heather G

Harrison Park School

I attended the Teach to Lead Summit in Boston and proposed an idea about creating a website for professional development. I am in the middle of creating videos to post on my created website. I am envisioning quick 7 minute videos to show teachers exactly what it looks like to integrate technology into a classroom, what app to use and what CCSS it aligns with. Attached is the first attempt to create the site for what it may look like. It is a work in progress- needs better video quality etc. but this is roughly what it will look like.

Link: http://innovationgrps.weebly.com/

Profile d ocica2 400x400

Carlos D

Escuela Bella Vista

As a Teacher Librarian, I try to guide the students to the use of internet with video searching whenever they have the need of expanding whatever knowledge they are acquiring in the moment. I feel is important the learner knows he has the power to conduct his own learning, feeding his curiosity. Of course, my guidance is there all the time.

Profile 6ee197fe2ceac9e78f4e4bd5b9a59448 400x400

Beth B

Marquette Elem School

I can’t imagine doing the work I do without video. In our teacher residency training program, our resident teachers record their mentor's exemplary practice on a daily basis. They upload this to an online, private group through Teaching Channel where they view the videos. After viewing the clip and asking their mentor questions- the resident tries the strategy with students. Either the mentor or the coach (me) records the resident and uploads to that same online group. We ask reflective questions of the resident to accelerate their growth and development, and work to ensure that the next time they try that strategy it is more effective than before. This also allows us to share instructional practices across our district. I share a clip of an exemplary teacher with another coach-- who can share that clip with a struggling teacher. Or I can share a clip of one a teacher who is struggling with a coach and that coach can give me advice on what feedback to give that teacher. All without leaving our building!

There are so many incredibly inspirational people in the world that video is the easiest way to connect with them. I have used Sir Ken Robinson's TED talks, as well as many others, to see education from a different viewpoint and to also incorporate new ideas and ways of thinking into my teaching, as well as personal life. Videos can be extremely important in creating a learning experience for me when I feel that professional development opportunities I am offered at a local level do not assist in making me a stronger educator.

SA

Sherry A

Shelby County ATC

I am grateful for the opportunity to have access to TED talks. I feel the information is valuable and applicable. I just wish I had more time for PD during the school year, when the load of teaching a full day gets overwhelming. The TED talks are motivating and the resources available can readily be implemented into the classroom.

Profile xlh9j3zy 400x400

Courtney S

Brookside Elementary School, Big Rapids, MI

I have used videos for professional learning, but mostly within lessons to help teach students specific skills. I have video taped students modeling various management procedures using my iPhone and then using Appletv to mirror the video for students to see. This has helped them understand how to do different procedures without re-modeling them. Quick access to my videos on my phone projected onto the screen is immediately effective. I also use iMovie to share professional development experiences with my peers. I would like to add professional videos to my blog at 1voiceforeducation.wordpress.com

Link: http://www.1voiceforeducation.wordpress.com

Profile chi

Chris B

Academy for Urban School Leadership

Watching video of my practice with colleagues changed my life as a teacher. I was a very basic teacher early in my career when I joined a cohort of six teachers working together for a year to achieve National Board Certification. These weekly sessions where we shared short glimpses of our practice allowed me to experience dozens of strategies that I never saw in my own school. At a time when it was rare for administrators to set aside time to visit and learn from teachers within our schools, video provided opportunities to see how other middle school reading teachers managed discussions. I saw how they circulated with intention and provided ample time for students to dig in texts for new meaning. The examples of my own practice that I provided improved over time due to the safety of our cohort. We were critical, but cordial. Video is a powerful tool when teachers provide a safe space to reflect and provide honest feedback.

Profile z7cvxgul 400x400

Katie H

Downers Grove District #58

The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) National Conference occurs in April each year. I have never been able to attend, but spent a lot of time reading twitter during the conference this year. What I came across as a off shoot of this conference has really impressed me in terms of using videos for professional learning. Three leaders in the field of mathematics education solicited and encouraged six other leaders to share a "call to action" with attendees. They were limited to 10 minutes and the presentations were live tweeted and recorded. The videos were then put online for any to view or view again. While I wasn't at the conference I have watched these videos and been inspired by these calls to action. One more element that was just added recently to this website was a Facilitator's Guide. So now if you would like to use these videos with colleagues or as professional learning tool you have resources to assist you in this endeavor.

Link: http://www.shadowmathcon.com/

Profile y4pwotqf 400x400

Celine

Magnolia Elementary

As a common core facilitator and tech coach with my district, for the past few years, I've used videos on both common core topics and ed tech issues and trends to help fellow teachers with gaining overviews, better understanding of these topics. As we till out 1:1 Chromebooks, Android tablets and iPads, I'm utilizing videos in trainings to help my fellow teachers gain a better understanding of the various blended learning models and show video examples of these models in action to inspire and motivate our teachers.

Profile je5ietkl 400x400

Anabel

Mooresville Senior High

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then video is worth a trillion. Videos that demonstrate the implementation of teaching strategies and methods have been invaluable to me in professional learning. Teaching Channel is my go-to site for professional learning in terms of classroom instruction. From instructional technology to academic conversations to differentiation techniques, nothing has been more powerful than watching it first hand. It's like traveling to another classroom for an observation without having to leave our school. It's easy on time and budget, but the benefits are enormous.

Link: https://www.teachingchannel.org

EH

Dunke

National Teachers Academy, Tarkington School of Excellence, Dodge Renaissance Academy

My experience with video has been videotaping my practice and reflecting on how it meets the needs of my students and teachers. I did this as an pre-service teacher at Stanford, to obtain National Board certification. I currently use video as a coach to refine my practice and that of the teachers on my caseload.

I had found it really helpful to watch video of myself – it helped me notice my upspeak (how irritating!). As a team meeting facilitator, I asked my colleagues, "What if, instead of just rehearsing lessons in our team meetings, one of us video taped ourselves and we watched together?" My colleagues thought it was awesome, and agreed it was much more helpful to watch a video of yourself than having other people come in and tell you what they saw.

A teacher I work with was anxious about some of the students she taught. I came in to discretely take some video. We sat down afterward and identified what was causing her anxiety, and it ended up being two kids who sat next to each other and played off one another, which would blow up into whole classroom stuff. We separated them the next day and then class ran rather smoothly. Identifying that was very positive – and it was just me and my colleague, nobody else – no principal, no instructional coach – just the two of us watching the video, identifying that two people sitting next to each other was the issue.

you
Attach a link and we'll display it alongside your post.

Show 43 More Experiences Show Less

Theme

Please share a personal story about an experience with professional learning.


28 experiences
Profile gjzucpjk 400x400

Carly B

Boyd County High School

I had to video myself for the National Board process. It was the quickest way to share a lesson and receive feedback from teachers in other schools/districts. It also gave me a real snapshot into my types of questions and what my space filler words are. I realized that instead of asking for understanding, I just used the word, "Okay?" Now I am attempting to use formative assessment techniques to figure out what my students understand.

Profile 9wfxhn1b 400x400

Heidi G

Davless Public Schools (Kentucky)

For years, there was little to no PD for teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing in the state. I had to beg the school for the deaf if I could attend PD theirs or travel out of state. Can you imagine what it was like to not have learning opportunities close to your home in your specialty? It was beyond frustrating. There wasn't even a professional organization for DHH teachers in KY. So one day, 5 years ago I had enough. I emailed every DHH teacher I knew and recruited a group to help form a DHH teacher organization. Before we even filed our articles of incorporation, we started offering 1-2 hour PD during our planning meetings. This quickly grew into Saturday PD. Then, less than a year after filing our incorporation papers, we had a 2-day summer conference. This year will be our 4th annual conference where we will have 19 breakout sessions on a variety of topics just for us! Sometimes, if your needs are not being met, you have to take the bull by its horns and lead!

EF

Elizabeth F

Fremont School District 79

When staff evaluate our professional learning events in my district they repeatedly indicate that they want choice and voice. They want a choice in the sessions that they attend and they want a voice in determining the content of the day. In my district we are working to personalize professional learning for all of our teachers. We are building action research cohorts for groups of teachers with common interests. We are developing teacher leaders through coaching seminars. Our shared leadership and focus on interdependence shines through in our professional learning opportunities.

Profile me

Ashley LS

North Oldham High School

The best professional learning experiences I've had have been when I have had authentic personal learning experiences. For example, the National Writing Project primarily focuses on giving teachers time to write for themselves and spend time really thinking like a writer, so that when we go back into the classroom to teach writing, we don't just have theories, but concrete experiences to talk about. My students love when I share something I've written myself. And anytime I have been blessed with opportunities to travel or meet new people, I always bring those lessons back to my students. When I sit down to plan with colleagues, my brain is constantly bouncing around "this time I saw that show...", or "that book I read last summer...", or "I once met this guy who..." All of those experiences feed into my teaching life. I wonder if there is a way to give teachers structures and opportunities for turning our own passions into lessons for our kids.

In part due to PGES and teacher self-reflection (as well as limited budgets!), I can see video professional development becoming a very important resource for teachers in the very near future. I have used video professional development and have experienced a mixed assortment of quality. I value seeing the strategy being used in a real setting but I find that the videos that help me the most have downloadable worksheets/graphic organizers or something tangible to help work through the learning process rather than just sit and get. A quality take-away will help teachers to actually implement new learning to their present teaching environment for enhanced teaching effectiveness.

Profile jht dzgj 400x400

Katie R

North Bullitt High School

My best professional learning has come through experiences and collaboration with other teachers. Sometimes it has been more formal, and sometimes just a quick conversation with a colleague. So many of us have so much to offer to each other and the power of collaboration in education could really be what changes our profession. The best professional learning experiences I have been involved in offer time for collaboration, and that is what makes it powerful.

The most meaningful professional learning I have experienced is when it is authentic and relevant, and when I've been able to take ownership of the experience. Seeing other people teach, giving feedback on it, seeing other's feedback, hearing the teacher reflect on the lesson: these all allow me to start to internalize how I can use their practice to impact my own. When I was learning how to do Reading Workshop, we watched lots of videos of colleagues and were able to all collect data about the experience and then discuss and give feedback to the teacher through a safe protocol, and we didn't have to rearrange schedules or have substitutes teaching our classes to observe in another room. Then, together we worked to plan the follow up lessons so the teacher had what they needed to return to class the following day.

I completed my MAT through the University of Southern California while on active duty in the Army. I often streamed content and class discussions while sitting on the hood of my humvee away from home, after work. These videos expanded my vision of what was possible in the classroom, even though I wasn't in a school full-time for observation: I could immediately begin trying a new strategy in the classroom after seeing it modeled. The videos connected directly to available research, and resonated with my experiences. This year at Shelby County, I benefited from similar videos on how to conduct data team meetings, and TPGES self and peer evaluations. These would have been difficult to ask aloud in a room full of new colleagues, where often I simply "don't know what I don't know." Using videos of successful instruction, assessment, reflection and collaboration allows first year teachers like me to hit the ground running, and accelerates our learning with colleagues in a way that is low-threat and high-impact.

EF

Elizabeth F

Fremont School District 79

In my district we have recently begun using videos to have collaborative conversations about exemplary teaching. We break into heterogenous groups and review sample video clips, looking for specific teaching strategies. The conversations that my 150 teachers have are deep, engaging, thoughtful, and reflective. They have commented that these short video analysis sessions are very helpful in their professional growth. While we provide some structured questions to guide conversations, when I listen in the teacher groups are talking about concepts at a far deeper level than my administrative team could have ever hoped for. Collaboratively deconstructing video examples can be a very powerful learning tool.

Profile head shot

Missy C

Butler Traditional High School

In the past, I've used video of my students to illustrate the teacher moves I make when working with students in literacy instruction. This is especially helpful when I'm providing professional development, because then attendees can see--in context-- the strategy I'm offering. In addition, I often embed other video for use as a shared text for the group, or to illustrate an idea--or as a prompt for us to write into the day.

Profile mudder rings14

Lisa Garner

Apollo High School

Each year the state of KY requires training on suicide prevention. This is an important topic and one that needs to be revisited each year to help underscore its importance and ensure that educators know the warning signs, etc. At the beginning of the training there is a pre-test which is followed by several video segments then the actual test which each educator must pass. I would like to see the pre-test be scored and then the video segments be assigned based on the questions that the educators answered incorrectly, thus individualizing the videos. I believe this concept could be applied to other online trainings to help individualize them and help teachers get what they need from trainings.

When teachers and administrators describe or recount how they resolve conflicts and address negative or distracting behavior in the classroom, there is rarely enough time to ask all the questions I have. In order to learn the most from colleagues' experiences, I would benefit from video modeling of conflict resolution techniques that have been tried and shown effective with students in the classroom, such as Restorative Justice techniques. These videos should incorporate student voice, showing what it looks like when both students and teachers are able to "Think Win-Win" and tackle difficult conversations, where all parties emerge having "Sought First to Understand, then to Be Understood." I would like to deal with these conversations more efficiently and consistently by picking the best strategies, to maximize instructional time and minimize distractions.

Profile 1udeajhe 400x400

Angela d

Maryland State Department Of Educat

I use videos in two ways for professional learning. I create a tutorial and post the video online for educators as a reference. Or I use video in a presentation to reinforce a topic, add humor, or show an example of a topic.

Our team utilizes the Edivate/PD360 and Teaching Channel videos as a resource for formal and informal professional learning opportunities. In addition, we utilize these platforms to upload locally created videos of exemplary lessons. Our new teacher mentors do an excellent job of utilizing these video libraries for suggested strategies, assisting with classroom implementation, and then following up with coaching conversations. These video libraries are helpful, but without a champion to help guide the teachers to appropriate videos, it is "iffy" if the teacher will find them on his/her own. If districts/sites can align videos to their goals to assist easy access, this may help make them more useful.

I used videos for professional learning during my National Boards. It was a tremendous opportunity for me to script the lesson and examine my own teaching. The learning was extremely personal and meaningful.

I'm an instructional coach and have found it very valuable to take short videos of my teachers' practice as they relate to their coaching foci. Sharing these videos with teachers, and then analyzing the strengths, challenges, and next steps together has been enormously helpful in generating teacher ownership over the improvement in their practice, as well our capacity to accurately monitor progress and set logical next steps in order to accomplish our coaching foci.

I'm an instructional coach and have found it very valuable to take short videos of my teachers' practice as they relate to their coaching foci. Sharing these videos with teachers, and then analyzing the strengths, challenges, and next steps together has been enormously helpful in generating teacher ownership over the improvement in their practice, as well our capacity to accurately monitor progress and set logical next steps in order to accomplish our coaching foci.

Profile 6ee197fe2ceac9e78f4e4bd5b9a59448 400x400

Beth B

Marquette Elem School

The greatest professional learning I have experienced is when I am asked to do the work we ask our students to do- particularly as it relates to the CCSS. The knowledge I have related to the ELA CCSS came from taking part in sample lessons where I was a student, and the facilitator walked us through a close reading lesson as the teacher. This taught me the important components of the standards that we were addressing, how to bring this learning to life for students through a well-selected, complex text and questioning, and the tools and organizers to help track our thinking and learning.

Profile 1izefdrj 400x400

Ben

Glenn Duncan Elementary School

Currently we've created a cohort of teachers that is using social media to enhance their own personal professional learning. This group of diverse educators includes teachers, administrators and coaches. Using tools like Twitter, Voxer and Instagram, the cohort is working to showcase the instruction in their schools and build their own repertoire. Cohort members will soon be nominating new members who they will then mentor for the next year to begin using social media to enhance the professional learning experience.

Profile chi

Chris B

Academy for Urban School Leadership

I am very fortunate to have been involved with a lot of high-quality professional learning, but one example that stays with me is the Reading Apprenticeship training I received through WestEd in Oakland. This professional learning lasted a week and focused on asking the participants to engage in a lot of work that we are asking our students to do. There was a lot of practice in analyzing texts and making the same mistakes that our students often make when asked to analyze text. We read extremely complicated college engineering textbooks and reflected on the strategies we used to get some kind of meaning out of them (e.g. diagrams, headings, oft repeated concepts). Then we watched video of exemplary instruction using the RA model. It was all challenging, informative and very, very fun.

Profile 858907ddb8e2739d6d14b00acccc4c1c 400x400

Jana B

Daviess County Public Schools (KY)

One of my best professional learning opportunities was attending a Common Core Convening hosted by Student Achievement Partners. Student Achievement Partners continues to create innovative, supportive, and timely professional learning experiences that teachers can IMMEDIATELY implement in the classroom. They listen to the needs of teachers and are constantly curating and developing products that are free.

Link: http://achievethecore.org/

MS

Margaret S

University of Colorado Colorado Springs

I work with teachers aspiring to become school principals. I use video of teaching to help them learn to gather evidence of teaching to inform discussions with teachers that will help the teachers grow as instructional leaders in their classrooms. It is evident in the literature that we, as educators, are not "on the same page" with our views of effective teaching and its components. Using video to inform our conversations about what effective teaching entails and then using that information to inform our conversations with teachers will greatly enhance our collective views (both teachers and administrators) on what exactly it means to be an effective teacher.

Profile cdc6e669b830c39b891b27b1cc31ed24 400x400

Elaine S

Downers Grove North High School

I work with teachers both in coaching sessions and in larger group professional development offerings. An increasing focus of this work is the creation of individualized PD that meets teachers where they are and pushes them to the next level. This iPD changes the traditional structures of PD and directly leads to shifts that positively impact classroom practice. Video has been an effective tool in supporting these changes. Whether teachers are examining a strategy in practice via Teacher Tube or Ted Ed or even a lesson that does not go as planned (such as Sarah Brown Wessling's "When a Lesson Goes Wrong" on the Teaching Channel), the multimodality of the resources helps teachers exercise their own voice in PD. A cadre is even jumping into lesson study and is exploring a new set of possibilities. Every one of these teachers and coaches makes it a point to try a new challenge--and to share the results, either in video or another form, working to determine the direction of their own PD.

I find coaching to be an effective means of increasing teacher performance. I started using video because of my own experience with being on video-its hard to see yourself until you really see yourself. When we teach, we can only see the classroom from our own eyes. But when we see video of ourselves teaching, we see the way students see us, and this is a very powerful thing. Using video in coaching teachers made a big difference for me and for teachers. For the teacher, he or she is able to see the exact moments that I coach them through. When I use video, I always get the "OMG I didn't realize that's what I did!" reaction from teachers and they appreciate the experience greatly. I find that video is not only good for coaching, but for sharing exemplary practices with a community of teachers and administrators. Teachers have to envision themselves implementing instruction. I also love that in a community of teachers, videos can be used to coach each other when the goal is more effective teaching.

Link: https://www.dropbox.com/s/g8p37g52nb92gzr/Coaching%20with%20video.mov?dl=0

“I can’t wait for and am so excited for the three day ‘sit and git’ professional development in-service at our school” said no teacher possibly ever. This is the problem. I have always found mandated professional experiences, typically done as in-services, with pre-selected topics and speakers to be painful. They often focus on Just-In-Case rather than Just-In-Time. In other words, the trainings often don't address individual educators' needs. Given all of the ways to access and share videos, information, ideas, resources, the sit and git PD model is antiquated. This model also doesn't respect teacher agency - where the teacher identifies his or her own professional development needs and then specifies the steps and resources to address those needs. She the attached link for my model of a professional development model based on teacher agency.

Link: https://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2013/11/11/teacher-agency-self-directed-professional-development/

Profile z7cvxgul 400x400

Katie H

Downers Grove District #58

Professional learning is also personal learning. Just like our students are not one size fits all, neither are we as educators. Twitter has allowed me to find my niche of what I most want to improve in my professional life and a community with similar goals. The #elemmathchat and #MTBoS has not only given me a network of individuals that push my thinking as a math teacher, but also have helped me find a masters program that will support my goals of professional learning that is not offered in my geographical area.

Profile lso8cxsk 400x400

Dawn F

Jefferson-Lewis BOCES

I have been working as an instructional coach for the past year. The premise of my employment was that I would coordinate a group of district level coaches and implement a peer coaching program in a district in my region. I was so excited to get started! I had to ease my way in so I would just go and watch with no expectations of follow up conversations or topics to watch for. Inevitable, we would have a conversation after the lesson and the teachers began to trust me. Unfortunately, the year is now over and we were just getting to the point where we could start working together in a more purposeful way. We were just starting to introduce teacher-led PD at faculty meetings. I hope they continue but it will have to be without me.

MW

Melanie W

Elementary school in Florida

One of my best professional learning experiences was when I had the opportunity to choose the topic myself. I chose a training in the new math standards and we met for 10 days throughout the school year to continue touching base and sharing our experiences. It was wonderful! For four consecutive days over the summer we acted as students and were given word problems with the new standards so we could solve them ourselves. We spent time working in groups to share our solutions, just as our students should do. The modeling was a great way to show us how to teach in our classrooms. Throughout the school year we would read a couple chapters in a book and implement the strategies suggested. We would reconvene each month to share experiences and tweak as necessary. I became a great math teacher after this professional learning experience!

you
Attach a link and we'll display it alongside your post.

Show 26 More Experiences Show Less

Theme

What needs to change about professional learning video so it better supports your practice?


21 experiences
Profile lauerman  donna

Donna3278

Rockcastle County High School

I envision a bank of professional development videos similar in style to the layout of Netflix. By using a detailed system of organization with peer rating reviews, educators could select the best video(s) for their individual needs without wasting valuable time.

Profile srrbdwb8 400x400

Aaron G

Huffaker Elementary School

The professional learning cannot live in a vacuum. Each video must be accompanied by well-vetted curricular resources and evidence-based pedagogical moves. Consequently, educators can apply what they are learning and match theory to practice. This is what classroom teachers did in Reno, Nevada through the Core Task Project. Teachers would meet to review free video from those who were willing to have their voices recorded and posted at place like Youtube and Vimeo (e.g. David Coleman, Dr. Freddy Hiebert, Dr. Karen Wixson, Dr. Lilly Wong Fillmore) and then take lessons and resources into the classroom to see how students responded. Moreover, often teachers would volunteer to be taped and a community could watch the learning unfold through lesson demonstrations. This was a teacher-driven effort that cost the school district almost nothing and was easily scaled across buildings and classrooms.

as

asim s

harmony science academy san antonio tx

In my experience, professional learning videos must include the support of trained personnel /teachers/administrators or as such, who will be able to provide help at a moment's notice if and when needed AFTER a teacher FAILS to implement what he/she learned from the professional learning video a month ago or at the beginning of the school year. The purpose (in my opinion) is to not to watch a video, agree to it, learn a thing or two and plan on implement those ideas into the classroom with a little or no benefit, but to use the learned knowledge in a precise manner, with the help of a 'coach' who will be able to guide the teacher to start, watch over as it goes, and congratulate at the end of its success. I do believe in 'wishful thinking' though!

Videos are way too long! I don't have time to wade through countless videos trying to find the useful ones. I think it would be great to have micro credentialing so I could determine which videos are considered high quality by my peers. I also think making them more specific would be helpful. For example, maybe tagged like: Third grade teachers uses process for teaching close reading.

Profile 6f ndb6b 400x400

Todd B

Warren Woods Middle School

There needs to be a complete video data base that is searchable by subject area, grade level and strategy. There also needs to be multiple videos that show the struggles and challenges of implementation. Currently most videos seem to just show exemplar practice.

The videos need to have purpose. When tied to the adult learning theory of a self-identified need, the video becomes much more powerful. As teachers prepare to teach their classes and meet individual learner needs, they seek videos tied to their own professional learning goals. As long as others continue to direct the learning of teachers, teachers will not find them as helpful. It may be less about the video and more about the processes and purposes teachers perceive. Are we doing things "to" them or "with" them?

Profile 7d5d89d3431c40e5de9ae6bf8f0297ba 400x400

Heather G

Harrison Park School

I think short video clips no longer than 10 minutes are best. All contained in one location would be best.

LS

Lora S

Shelby County

Professional learning videos need to be authentic, vetted, catalogued, searchable, and clipped so that teachers see in practice just what they need to see and cut out all of the superfluous things that we all know and understand happen around the target event being observed. In this way, teachers can find just what they need and see exemplars that demonstrate best practice in a practical way.

Profile jht dzgj 400x400

Katie R

North Bullitt High School

I think it would be great if professional learning videos came in some type of series. They could be sort videos but together made up a whole series. It would include everything from how to get you started, support along the way, and seeing the strategy in practice. I also think that some type of collaboration piece to go along with the videos would be very beneficial. That way when you began to implement you had support and feedback on your own practice.

In real time, when you go into an authentic classroom, I see that as a sporting event. Good things happen, bad things happen, and it's all natural – very organic. You can see everything that is going on within a large space in a real environment. Videos from our district can be valuable, but I see them more as movies – as scripted and perfect – and it's tough to identify with as a teacher. You know the classroom is never perfect, in fact it's far from it.

Videos for professional development reinforce passive learning like "sit and git". We are living in an age of social networking where consumers expect to have a voice. I foresee videos that permit comments. If I were to design such a platform, the videos would be short on topics of interest to teachers - e.g., classroom management strategies like transitions; getting attention, etc., instructional strategies - e.g., cooperative learning, etc. These short videos would have pause options where open-ended questions would be asked of the audience. They would have the option to answer the questions face-to-face if working with a group or they could answer them through the video platform (like a comments section in Youtube). The saved comments would be available for other teachers to view. The results/benefits would be twofold: (1) interactivity would be increased, and (2) ideas would be crowdsourced where teachers can view the thoughts and ideas of other practitioners.

Profile img 1167

Derek

Pittsburgh Perry Hs

I think it is important that we not limit our vision of videos of professional learning to just watching another teacher or ourselves teaching. Our practice can be impacted by any kind of video whether it is a movie, a TedTalk, a YouTube video, or even a music video. Anything that stretches our professional thinking and makes us more effective in the classroom is an effective use of video to promote professional learning.

Profile cgszakdz 400x400

Ana S

Ricardo Flores Magon Academy

I have been able to use videos of lessons of classrooms out side of my school as a teaching tool for teachers and have heard comment that those classrooms are way to perfect, not real, etc. When they observe classrooms of teachers they know and have a connection. The outcome is for the most part positive. I have seen relationships and confidence grow.

Profile 858907ddb8e2739d6d14b00acccc4c1c 400x400

Jana B

Daviess County Public Schools (KY)

Teachers are having a hard time with teaching for conceptual understanding within mathematics. Some teachers may not know themselves why certain things are in mathematics, how can they teach it? I had the opportunity to participate in the Erikson Early Math Collaborative. Watching their videos that exemplified best practices on instruction and assessment was a great professional learning experience.

Link: http://earlymath.erikson.edu/

A while ago I watched a video in "exemplary" category, focused on transitions. Do I think that every transition they have looks like that, every day of the year? I would love to see that. I've worked with five and six year olds for ten years. If there are five transition a day (which there are easily – there can be 10 transitions between coming to the carpet and back), there is no way in their nature as human beings that they're perfect every time by May 31. My response to that video: Please. I don't believe your room looks like that, nor do I want my classroom to look like that.

Profile z7cvxgul 400x400

Katie H

Downers Grove District #58

I agree with the previous posts that professional learning videos can not be one size fits all. To me, videos (as a professional learning tool) serve as a motivator (TED Talks, etc.). There are so many types of professional learning videos that do and could exist (curriculum focused, classroom management, technology instructions, motivation, etc.) What type of video is the focus of change? All types? I have a hard time viewing videos as a professional learning tool to improve my teaching unless there is a shared experience and follow-up with my colleagues. This may be online colleagues or in school colleagues but it is hard for me to envision watching a video and making meaningful changes without reflection.

Profile pro close up

Ernie R

Walter Johnson Junior High School

When using video to support my practice, I would like to see Choice and Variety. I've sat through a few sessions where we had to watch a 40 minute video of exemplary teaching. The teaching may have been great, but the video put me to sleep! I'd suggest using clips of video, chunking the distribution, with the opportunity to view the entire video at a later time. Variety means that teachers be encouraged to make videos as well as view them. Create a departmental video that shows what's working in our classrooms or how online resources are used. A department's video would be viewed by other departments, to help teachers determine how to help students make connections between their classes. Years ago, I realized how students revised their work as they created videos and watched other students' videos. School-made videos can complement professionally-made videos to stimulate reflection and discussion within a faculty.

JS

Jami S

Educational Service Unit

I think differentiation in professional development is key! No more "one size fits all"

MW

Melanie W

Elementary school in Florida

Professional learning videos need a component that provides the opportunity for us to apply the skills collaborate with others. Too often PL videos are one and done, but true professional learning is a growth opportunity that needs revision. Taking a video and breaking it up into segments would help. Each segment should focus on one particular skill through modeling, and at the end challenge us to apply the skill in our classroom. There should be a forum where we can upload videos of ourselves utilizing the skill or written reflections sharing how we tweaked the strategy to make it our own and challenges/questions that arose. Other educators would give feedback to uploaded experiences and we would form a community of learners.

Profile katephoto

Kate F

Michigan's Integrated Mathematics Initiative

Video needs to include a chance to watch ourselves and each other, and then communicate directly about them, in addition to the endless libraries of "how to" or "exemplary" type teaching videos. Being able to do this pseuo-anonymously, across state lines, would be great. Also, having a way to make engaging amateur video even better would be good. Commenting needs to be more direct to the person, with a move away from long comment streams that are hard to keep up with and locate specific responses in.

Elevating Professional Development with Cameras in the Classroom - Using VIEWpath and SAFARI Montage LOR most of the hurdles of creating a library of Authentic videos is for PD is a a reality. Teachers can record them self as often as they like and only need to go back and watch the ones they want. The rest are automatically removed from the system. You never know when that moment you want to capture is going to happen. Newton County Georgia creates between 600 and 800 teacher recordings a day. You should be able to find some good moments to share in that stack. Making the process easy for the teachers is the key. They also decide what is shared or deleted.

Link: http://t.co/8W46EJsLAL

you
Attach a link and we'll display it alongside your post.

Show 19 More Experiences Show Less

Know people who have something to add to this conversation?

More people means more problems solved. Share this challenge!